Boosted AE86 Monster… Part 2

The main reason for this rebuild was to rectify some problems Corey encountered with the build as it started to evolve. Basically the car wasn’t quite how Corey envisioned it to be, and he took this opportunity as a second chance at building the car. This is generally unheard of actually, as not many people would be dedicated enough to undergo such a huge change. For most enthusiasts something like this would be a passing thought; after making adjustments to the setup, the remaining issues would be worked around the best way possible and that would be the end of it. The mere fact Corey acted on this thought puts him in a completely different category. It is often said that when faced with a challenge Corey doesn’t see a problem but rather a solution. It’s that type of thinking that motivated Corey to take the step towards making this rebuild a reality.

With passion comes dedication, and Corey wasted no time in assembling the car after receiving it back from Bishton’s Sandblasting. In just a matter of days the car was ready to drive. Today I have some photos of the reassembly for you guys along with a few changes that Corey made along the way.

 

For those of you who would like a recap of the build so far, I’ve provided the links below…

Boosted AE86 Moster… Introduction

Boosted AE86 Moster… Part 1

 

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The office reassembled… Test fitting the seat with the new custom Stanford Industries seat brackets…

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Accusump and fire extinguisher mounted along with a custom floor plate and foot rest for any passengers willing enough to go for a drive…

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A look at the rear where things are coming together quite nicely. Corey opted to plate the rear to hide the previously exposed fuel components. In my opinion it gives the the interior a much cleaner appearance…

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A battery stand was fabricated and bolted in its new location…

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The spare wheel well was cut and plated similar to the old shell, but with a much nicer finish. Corey also decided to change up things a bit this time around, you will notice there is an absence of the water injection that he was previously using but the fuel system remains the same.

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With this rebuild Corey strayed away from the side exit exhaust and chose to run a full exhaust exiting to the back of the car…

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A glimpse of the bay as it comes together…

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The front end being fitted together, with headlights and the intercooler mounted in place…

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Partial side shot, as you can see the flares and the side skirts are still to be fitted…

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Fully back in business…

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For those who might be wondering, this was previously a padded bucket seat that Corey stripped to be redone but started to like the raw exposed look and decided to keep it that way.

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Close up of the hydraulic handbrake and the sequential shifter for the Saenz TT3 gearbox…

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Switch panel with adjustable launch control which can be set by turning the knob to the desired RPM depending on Corey’s preference…

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A full view of the interior where Corey started work on the custom seat brackets for the passenger side…

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Rather than go with a one off dash like the previous AE86, Corey wanted to retain the standard dashboard for a more timeless appearance…

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Custom mounted boost gauge and a digital gear indicator positioned in Corey’s field of vision…

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Mounted to the other side of the dash you can find the AEM wideband gauge, and the AiM digital dash centrally mounted to the steering column for a clear view of the display…

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A look at the progress made with the interior so far…

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Taking a look above, mounted are some switches which control the lights…

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Another personal touch Corey added to the car were these custom aluminum door cards…

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A matching pair can be found to the rear of the car as well…

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The battery fitted in its new custom made tray…

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The plumbing for the rear brakes and hydraulic handbrake…

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Fuel lines ran as neat as possible…

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The bay finally complete….

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A closer look at the custom made intake manifold with a 70mm throttle body…

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Close up of the Garrett GT35 turbo with custom made manifold and Tial 44mm wastegate…

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Corey made sure there was adequate cooling with this build with the choice of a full sized dual core radiator with two OEM Toyota fans. One of the two fans mounted is ran direct and the other is controlled through the Autronic SM4 ECU…

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Exposed are the Tien coilovers but if you look a little closer you will realize the standard AE86 arms are no longer in use. Corey has completely changed the suspension on the front of the car. Not only have the shock towers been adjusted to allow for more caster angle; but also a custom built suspension setup based off a fwd platform to allow the car to run a wider wheel at the front without increasing the overall track of the car.

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A different approach was taken this time around when it came to S.D.R.R Motorsports livery; JVM Signage came up with a suitable design that can be seen from numerous angles…

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And also make its way onto the front end while still looking connected…

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Applied to the freshly painted fiberglass hood…

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A full view of how the front end came together…

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Fender flares fitted to bring back that aggressive stance from before… The XXR 527 wheels in a 17 x 9″ configuration still remain on the car…

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The car has been through some serious modifications to get to this point, but I must say it looks absolutely amazing…

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The car still maintains a reasonable ride height being fully registered to drive on the streets…

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A portion of the S.D.R.R Motorsports livery can be found going down either side of the car…

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The new livery added the finishing touches to an already awesome build…

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From the back rear quarter looking ahead…

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A close up of the rear bumper extensions fabricated by Danny…

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And I can’t leave you guys without a few shots of the big ass Stanford Industries wing…

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That brings us to the end of this post. Thanks for taking a look, I hope you guys enjoyed.

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