All-Wheel Drive EG9 Build… Part 1

 

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We’re back with a quick update on Bally’s EG9 build. Having done a large amount of research Bally was motivated to knock this thing out as fast as possible. He went ahead and started placing orders for the necessary items to execute the calibre of build in mind. We’ll be taking a look at the part as they arrived along with the additional progress which has been made to the shell.

 

For those who may want to view this build from the start I’ve provided the link below:

All-Wheel Drive EG9 Build… Introduction

 

Further research into the AWD conversions reveal there are two main options available to choose from. The first is the Wagovan which is what basically started the AWD craze. Unfortunately,  due to this discovery the prices on the Wagovan parts have significantly increased over time. In addition to this, they are also becoming scarce which tends to drive the price point even further.

On the flip side, the CRV AWD setup is very readily available and significantly more cost effective. But It does come at a slight disadvantage when looking to make a large amount of horsepower, which it is not suited for in factory form…

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As a result of this some upgrades were necessary and Bally acquired a Gear-X AWD LSD that would be more suited for the application he will be using the car for…

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The factory CRV differential torn apart in the process of swapping out for the upgraded Gear-X unit…

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A look at the Gear-X LSD fitted in place before sealing the housing…

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Along with the LSD that was added to the CRV differential to ensure power is transferred through both wheels, some robust mods are required. In order to push the limits where power stands, the rear differential clutch pack is pinned and welded to prevent any slippage. However, this also has a downside and causes the ratios between the front and rear to ultimately destroy themselves.

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A viscous coupler typically from the Wagovan is added to the system to prevent this from happening but once again with prices astronomically high Bally opted to source one from a Freelander…

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As for the gearbox, a PPG 1st through 4th turbo drag kit was added to ensure there are no issued when it comes to selecting the gears. To eliminate slippage from the front wheels the factory LSD was tossed and replaced with a Wavetrac unit…

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The car currently sits on a set of 15×8 wheels at all four corners; the rears are wrapped with Hankook Ventus rubber in a 215/580 sizing…

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And the front wheels  were fitted with a pair of Maxxis RC-1 tyres in a 225/45 series…

 

However for the target power Bally has in mind for the build, they wouldn’t be adequate to deliver the kind of performance necessary for him to hit his goals…

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After doing some much needed research on wheel sizes and having looked thought several manufacturers. Bally was able to find what was in his eyes, a cost effective alternative to the ever popular sought after drag racing wheels. Replicating the wheel specs down to the beadlock feature, the fronts are 13×10 and in the rear 15×7. The major upside to the wheels are the price point given that Bally is still trying to keep the build very budget focused where possible. The downside is the added weight over the higher end of drag wheels but in the grand scheme of things the extra weight is negligible…

 

Having sourced a set of wheels for the Civic, Bally was now on the hunt for some fenders that would accommodate the large 13×10 wheels…

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He was fortunate enough to find a drag spec widebody front end locally. However, upon test fitting he realized the kit was purchased for a 2 door EG which wouldn’t allow it to fit as designed. Being sold on the front end, Bally went ahead and placed an order for the for the 4 door compatible version…

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Having dealt with varying build over the years Bally knew how important a car’s suspension components are when it comes to setting fast times. With the Civic being a dedicated drag car, Bally wanted as minimal play between suspension components and opted to go with spherical bushings throughout the car…

 

The K Series motor is designed such that the intake is placed towards the front of the car. The motor orientation within the engine bay has the throttle body opening on the left side. When turbocharging this requires the use of more pipe, on a street car this wouldn’t typically be a problem but given the purpose of the build, Bally wanted as direct a path as possible to the intercooler…

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When selecting an intake manifold he went with a Skunk2 centre feed unit which would allow for the shortest possible routing to the intercooler. Based on the skunk2’s intake design, it’s possible to increase the plenum volume and of course Bally took advantage of this with the addition of a 2.0L spacer…

 

Being heavily involved in the motorsport scene, Bally is a huge supporter of local talent. And in relation to head porting he uses DCR Motorsport for each of his engine builds. So naturally when the time came to build the Civic’s motor, Bally sent the head to receive a special treatment based on drag racing…

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After the head was back from DCR, Bally began the assembly with Supertech nitride intake and inconel exhaust valves. A set of 110lb Ferrea valve springs along with titanium retainers closed out the head package…

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A look at the K-Tuned throttle body mated to the Skunk2 centre feed being test fitted to the head…

 

Taking things to another level with this build Bally sourced a K24 block and crank and had them shipped to Cylinder Support Systems…

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While there the guys micro polished the crank and performed their cylinder reinforcement treatment; in addition to this the block was o’ring and received a fresh bore and deck…

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This was done in preparation for the R and R aluminum rods and the Traum 10:1 compression pistons Bally had planned for the bottom end…

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With all the parts in the island Bally wasted no time in assembling the long block with the addition of a ATI super dampener…

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Shortly after the gearbox was bolted up and the motor assembly was fitted into the EG9’s bay…

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After finally having the motor in place, Bally began to fit up the necessary components. A sidewinder stainless manifold was modified in order to receive the Precision 7275 Gen II turbo. The Skunk2 centre feed manifold also was fitted to the head along with a Hybrid racing fuel rail..

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When it came time to choose a ECU for the build, Bally did some research and decided to go with a Fuel Tech system. The main reason for this was to challenge himself working with one of the newer ECUs on the market to ultimately expand his knowledge base…

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In possession of the ECU he wasted no time and after verifying everything was functioning as it should, he went to work on building a base map to suit the specs of his setup…

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Having the motor assembly in place Bally went to work and executing the necessary fabrication required to have the driveshaft fitted and secured…

 

Closing out this post with a shot of the rear end of the Civic displaying the FCS Race billet subframe kit for the CRV differential…

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Thanks for taking a look and stay tuned for more on this project coming soon…

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